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WEIGHT: When applied to location theory, the relative attractive force of one activity to another based on transportation cost. The weight of an activity in this context is comparable to the weight of matter subject to gravitation forces. The weight of an activity is greater if it incurs higher transportation cost. As such, it is attracted, or pulled, to other activities to reduce transportation cost. With the weight (transportation cost) of an activity is often related to physical weight (heavier items cost more to move), it need not be. Other factors affecting weight include special handling (security, comfort) and type of transportation (walking, automobile, airplane).

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ATTRACTIVE FORCE: A force that causes activities to locate closer together. One primary attractive force is transportation cost and the weight of an activity. In this case, activities locate close together to reduce transportation cost. Another is agglomeration and urban economies. In this case, activities locate close together to lower other production cost. Attractive forces are countered by dispersive forces, which act to force activities farther apart.

     See also | weight | transportation | weight gaining | weight losing | agglomeration economies | urbanization economies | competition along a line | location theory | dispersive force |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, MONOPSONY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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