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AFL-CIO: The umbrella organization for many labor unions in the United States, with AFL standing for American Federation of Labor, and CIO the abbreviation of Congress of Industrial Organizations. The AFL-CIO began as just the AFL in 1886 as a collection of craft unions representing skilled workers. It expanded to include semiskilled and unskilled workers represented by industrial unions. Differing interests among the two groups lead to a division of the original AFL in 1938 into two separate groups -- the AFL containing craft unions and CIO containing industrial unions. This rift was closed in 1955, when the AFL and CIO merged to form the AFL-CIO.

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BACKSTOP RESOURCE: A sustainable, renewable natural resource that is used in place of, and as a substitute for, finite, exhaustible natural resources that have been exhausted. A sustainable resource is one in which the amount used today cannot reduce the amount available tomorrow.The best example is solar energy. No matter how much solar energy we use today, the same amount reaches the planet every day in the future. A backstop resource is then a sustainable resource, like solar energy, that society uses after finite resources, like fossil fuels, have been exhausted. In fact, solar energy is often considered THE backstop energy resource. It represents THE "safety net" that's available when fossil fuels are depleted.

     See also | natural resources | switching point | Hotelling's Rule | materials balance | recycling | exhaustible resource |


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VOTING PARADOX

The possibility that the voting preferences of a group of individuals results in an inconsistent, or intransitive, ranking. While consistent, or transitive, ranking of preferences is expected for individuals, such might not occur for groups of voters. If a consumer prefers good A to good B and good B to good C, then it makes logical sense that the consumer also prefers good A to good C. The voting paradox arises because a group of individuals might prefer A to B and B to C, but then prefer C to A, an inconsistent and intransitive ranking of preferences. Other related voting problems identified by the study of public choice includes the median voter principle, logrolling, and voter apathy (due to rational ignorance and rational abstention).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store looking to buy either a velvet painting of Elvis Presley or a wall poster commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
"Many people think that if they were only in some other place, or had some other job, they would be happy. Well, that is doubtful. So get as much happiness out of what you are doing as you can and don't put off being happy until some future date. "

-- Dale Carnegie

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World Federation of Trade Unions
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