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June 26, 2022 

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AE LINE: Another term for aggregate expenditure line, which is a line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

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DISINFLATION: A decline in the inflation rate. With disinflation, prices are still rising, they're just not rising as fast. Numerically speaking, if the inflation rate was 10% last year, 6% this year, and looks to be 4% next year, then we have disinflation. Disinflation, a reduction in the inflation rate, is not the same as deflation, a decline in the price level. Prices continue to rise with disinflation, just not as fast. Should disinflation continue, presumably because anti-inflationary monetary or fiscal policies are working effectively, then the average price level could decline and we make the transition to deflation.

     See also | inflation | inflation rate | deflation | price level | stabilization policies |


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LAW OF SUPPLY

The direct relationship between supply price and the quantity supplied, assuming ceteris paribus factors are held constant. This economic principle indicates that an increase in the price of a commodity results in an increase in the quantity of the commodity that sellers are willing and able to sell in a given period of time, if other factors are held constant. The law of supply is an important principle in the study of economics.

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