Google
Monday 
September 27, 2021 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
VARIABLE FACTOR OF PRODUCTION: An input whose quantity can be changed in the time period under consideration. This usually goes by the shorter term fixed input and should be immediately compared and contrasted with fixed factor of production, which goes by the shorter term fixed input. The most common example of a variable factor of production is labor. A variable factor of production provides the extra inputs that a firm needs to expand short-run production. In contrast, a fixed factor of production, like capital, provides the capacity constraint in production. As larger quantities of a variable factor of production, like labor, are added to a fixed factor of production like capital, the variable factor of production becomes less productive.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

GOOD: When used without an adjective modifier (like "final" good or "intermediate" good), this generically means a physical, tangible product used to satisfy people's wants and needs . This term good should be contrasted with the term service, which captures the intangible satisfaction of wants and needs. As such, you will frequently see the plural combination of these two phrases together "goods and services" to indicate the wide assortment of economic goods produced using the economy's scarce resources. As you might imagine this general notion of wants and needs satisfying goods and services pops up throughout the study of economics.

     See also | service | scarcity | unlimited wants and needs | limited resources | scarce resource | satisfaction | wants | needs | utility | asset | wealth | production | consumption | final good | intermediate good | gross domestic product | good types | barter |


Recommended Citation:

GOOD, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: September 27, 2021].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: good

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a perfectly competitive firm for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing perfectly competitive firm hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a perfectly competitive firm with no market control is horizontal.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

BLACK DISMALAPOD
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club hoping to buy either a 50-foot blue garden hose or a turbo-powered vacuum cleaner. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant. "

-- Robert Louis Stephenson, writer

FRS
Federal Reserve System
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2021 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster