Google
Sunday 
May 19, 2024 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
J CURVE: An interesting relationship that exists between the exchange rate for a nation's currency and its balance of trade. In principle, the drop in a nation's exchange rate, or price of currency, makes the currency less expensive to "buy." With "cheaper" currency the price of domestic production is less and the price of foreign stuff is more, causing an increase in exports to other countries and drop in imports coming in from foreign producers. The economy thus moves in the direction away from a trade deficit and toward a trade surplus. However, the first few months after a drop in the exchange rate the balance of trade goes in the other direction, with any existing trade deficit increasing or any trade surplus shrinking. This occurs because the quantities imported and exported don't change in the short run, but the prices do. Because more is paid for the same amount of imported goods and receive less for the same amount of exports, total spending on imports increases, total revenue received from exports declines, and the movement is in the trade deficit direction. Once those quantities start adjusting in the long run, then we see a movement in the direction of a trade surplus.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

IMPORT SUBSTITUTION: A strategy for economic development for a country based on replacing imported goods with domestic production. This is often directed toward imported inputs used for domestic production. The goal of this policy is to encourage domestic production, which subsequently increases domestic income and consumption. A contrasting economic development is export promotion.

     See also | economic development | export promotion | import | export | foreign trade | circular flow |


Recommended Citation:

IMPORT SUBSTITUTION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: May 19, 2024].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AUTONOMOUS EXPENDITURES

Expenditures on aggregate production by the four macroeconomic sectors that do not depend on income or production (especially national income or even gross domestic product). That is, changes in income do not generate changes in these expenditures. Each of the four aggregate expenditures--consumption, investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports--have an autonomous component. Autonomous expenditures are affected by the ceteris paribus aggregate expenditures determinants and are measured by the intercept term of the aggregate expenditures line. The alternative to autonomous expenditures are induced expenditures, expenditures which do depend on income.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time visiting every yard sale in a 30-mile radius trying to buy either decorative celebrity figurines or a flower arrangement with anything but tulips for your grandfather. Be on the lookout for slow moving vehicles with darkened windows.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Rosemary, long associated with remembrance, was worn as wreaths by students in ancient Greece during exams.
"The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. "

-- Vince Lombardi

ACH
Automated Clearinghouse
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2024 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster