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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE DETERMINANT: A ceteris paribus factor that affects aggregate expenditures, but which is assumed constant when the aggregate expenditure line is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate expenditures determinants cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into the four, broad expenditure categories -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. The reason is that changes in these expenditures are the direct cause of shifts in the aggregate expenditure line. If any determinant affects aggregate expenditures it MUST affect one of these four expenditures.

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IN-KIND PAYMENT: A payment, usually in exchange for the productive efforts of resources, that takes the form of goods and services rather than the economy's standard monetary unit (that is, dollars). In other words, resource owners are compensated with a portion of the output that they helped to produce. The standard method of compensation, which is illustrated by the circular flow model, is for a firm to pay resource owners using money revenue received from selling its production. Hence most factor payments are monetary payments. However, in some circumstances firms and resource owners find it more convenient to use actual production for compensation, eliminating the middle sell-production-for-money step

     See also | gross domestic product | National Income and Product Accounts | monetary unit | factor payment | income |


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THREE-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL

A Keynesian model of the macroeconomy that includes the three domestic sectors, the household sector, the business sector, and the government sector. This Keynesian model variation adds the government sector (or public sector) to the household and business sectors that make up the two-sector model. This model enables an analysis of government stabilization policies, especially how fiscal policy changes in government purchases and taxes can be used to close recessionary gaps and inflationary gaps. Equilibrium is identified as the intersection between the C + I + G line and the 45-degree line. Two related models are the two-sector Keynesian model and the four-sector Keynesian model.

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