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May 21, 2024 

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AGGLOMERATION: The clustering of several similar or related activities at the same location. Many industries have firms that tend to agglomerate, that is, locate very close to one another, leading to geographic concentration. For example, the motion picture industry is concentrated in California, the fashion industry is concentrated in New York, and the petroleum industry is concentrated in Texas. Agglomeration can be caused by accessibility to a concentrated natural resource (such as petroleum or sunny weather), but if often feeds upon itself through agglomeration economies. Firms in the same industry often have lower production cost when the located near their competitors.

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JOB VACANCY RATE: A simple little ratio of the number of job vacancies in our economy to the sum of employment and job vacancies. In essence, this measures the fraction of jobs in the economy that are open, but haven't been filled. To be included as an officially vacant job, employers must be actively searching to fill it with a warm body, by advertising in the paper, contacting employment offices, etc. Like the more common unemployment rate, the job vacancy rate is a useful indicator of the business cycle. When the economy is booming, the job vacancy rate is likely to be relatively high. A low rate signals a recession.

     See also | employment | unemployment rate | business cycle | recession | labor market | job losers | job leavers |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing firm hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The marginal factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped and lies above the average factor cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers seeking to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the first day of winter or software that won't crash your computer. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
"Carpe diem! Rejoice while you are alive; enjoy the day; live life to the fullest; make the most of what you have. It is later than you think."

-- Horace, Ancient Roman poet

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