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May 26, 2022 

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COMPANY TOWN: A small town closely associated with the production activity by a single firm. The firm is typically the only employer in the town and most of the goods and services sold throughout the town are provided by this firm. Company towns were quite prevalent in the late 1800s and early 1900s during the U.S. industrial revolution, often affiliated with a large mining, lumber, or manufacturing facility that was isolated from major urban areas. The company literally built a town around this facility to provide support services for their employees. The downside, however, was the lack of competition for both the employment of labor (monopsony) and the provision of consumer goods (monopoly). In some cases, the controlling firm exploited its market control creating circumstances not but different from slavery. Such company towns were a key motivation from the formation of labor unions.

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JOB VACANCY RATE: A simple little ratio of the number of job vacancies in our economy to the sum of employment and job vacancies. In essence, this measures the fraction of jobs in the economy that are open, but haven't been filled. To be included as an officially vacant job, employers must be actively searching to fill it with a warm body, by advertising in the paper, contacting employment offices, etc. Like the more common unemployment rate, the job vacancy rate is a useful indicator of the business cycle. When the economy is booming, the job vacancy rate is likely to be relatively high. A low rate signals a recession.

     See also | employment | unemployment rate | business cycle | recession | labor market | job losers | job leavers |


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JOB VACANCY RATE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: May 26, 2022].


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AVERAGE PHYSICAL PRODUCT

The quantity of total output produced per unit of a variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. Average physical product, usually abbreviated APP, is found by dividing total physical product by the quantity of the variable input. Average product, which more often goes by the shorter name average product (AP), is one of two measures derived from total physical product. The other is marginal physical product.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials seeking to buy either a dozen high trajectory optic orange golf balls or a large red and white striped beach towel. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
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AR(N)
A nth-order Autoregressive Process
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