March 19, 2018 

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PREMIUM: In financial terms, a bond or similar financial asset that sells above its face value. A premium is paid to equalize a bond's interest rate with comparable interest rates. For example, a $100,000 bond that pays a fixed 10 percent interest on the face value ($10,000) would be sell at a premium of $125,000 if comparable interest rates were 8 percent. As such, the $10,000 interest works out to be 8 percent of the $125,000 price.

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Lesson 1: Economic Basics | Unit 3: The Economy Page: 8 of 18

Topic: A Mixed Economy: Markets and Government <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

Markets do an effective (and efficient) job of answering the three questions of allocation--most of the time.
  • Markets are the VOLUNTARY exchange of goods and services.
  • A pure market economy is an economy that uses nothing but markets to allocate resources.
  • A pure market economy is a useful theoretical benchmark.
Market responses to the allocation questions:
  • What? Resources are used to produce goods with the highest prices.
  • How? Goods are produced using the combination of resource with the lowest prices.
  • For Whom? People with more income buy more goods.

Government also helps answer the three questions of allocation.
  • Government allocation is INVOLUNTARY. It sets the laws and rules.
  • A pure command economy is an economy that uses nothing but government to allocate resources.
  • A pure command economy is another useful theoretical benchmark.
Government responses to the allocation questions:
  • What? When government spends taxes, it dictates what goods will be produced.
  • How? Government has laws and rules that specify how resources will be used to produce goods.
  • For Whom? Government collects taxes from some people and distributes them among other people.

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A subset of the balance of payments accounts that tracks the flow of currency and other monetary assets in exchange for trade between one nation and other nations. It includes payments for imports and exports of both goods and services. It also includes monetary gifts or transfer payments to and from other nations. The current account is divided into three categories -- balance on merchandise trade, balance on services, and unilateral transfers. This is one of two primary subsets of the balance of payments. The other is the capital account. A deficit or surplus in the current account is matched by an opposite surplus deficit in the capital account.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store wanting to buy either a toaster oven that has convection cooking or a birthday gift for your mother. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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Cyrus McCormick not only invented the reaper for harvesting grain, he also invented the installment payment for selling his reaper.
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