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June 25, 2022 

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M: The standard abbreviation for imports produced by the domestic economy and purchased by the foreign sector, especially when used in the study of macroeconomics. This abbreviation is most often seen in the aggregate expenditure equation, AE = C + I + G + (X - M), where C, I, G, and (X - M) represent expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors, household, business, government, and foreign. The United States, for example, buys a lot of the stuff produced within the boundaries of other countries, including bananas, coffee, cars, chocolate, computers, and, well, a lot of other products. Imports, together with exports, are the essence of foreign trade--goods and services that are traded among the citizens of different nations. Imports and exports are frequently combined into a single term, net exports (exports minus imports).

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A PRIORI: A presumption made before an analysis is undertaken, often based on experiences, beliefs, or deductions from seemingly self-evident propositions about how the world works. This is a Latin for assumption or axiom. A similar sounding, but opposite term is a posteriori, which is derived from observation or facts. For example, in the study of economics of crime you might assume, a priori, that people are basically "good", because that just seems to be part of human nature, and conclude, a posteriori, that people are more likely to commit crimes when the threat of capture and conviction is lower.

     See also | axiom | assumption | theory | scientific method | a posteriori | principle | law | hypothesis | world view | data | empirical | verification |


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AVERAGE REVENUE CURVE, MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average revenue received by a monopolistically competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because average revenue is essentially the price of a good, the average revenue curve is also the demand curve for a monopolistically competitive firm's output.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale trying to buy either a small palm tree that will fit on your coffee table or several magazines on fashion design. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
"It is not fair to ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself. "

-- Eleanor Roosevelt, diplomat, activist

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