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June 18, 2024 

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TRANSFER PAYMENTS: Payments made without any corresponding production or expectations of production. Unless otherwise noted (such as business transfer payments), the term transfer payments generally refers to payments by the government sector to the household sector. The three most important transfer payments in our economy are for Social Security, unemployment compensation, and welfare. The intent of these transfers payments is to redistribute income, and thus the goods and services that can be had with the income. Transfer payments surface as income received but not earned (IRBNE) added to national income to derived personal income.

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COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION: One of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resource -- that is, the production of one good automatically triggers the production of the other. The terms "joint products" or "by-products" are two terms commonly used for complements-in-production. A complement-in-production is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of supply. The other is a substitute-in-production. An increase in the price of one complement-in-production causes a increase in supply of the other. Complements-in-production are goods produced jointly from the same resource or input. This typically happens when the resource in question has parts that can be separated into different products. One example is the production of two goods -- beef and leather -- from one resource -- cattle. Another complement in production example is lumber and sawdust, both produced from a single tree.

     See also | complement | supply | production | supply curve | other prices | supply shock | supply determinants | complement-in-consumption | joint product | by-product |


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OLIGOPOLY AND MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

Oligopoly and monopolistic competition have some similarities, but also have a few important differences. Both are examples of imperfect competition on the market structure continuum between ideals of perfect competition and monopoly. However, oligopoly contains a small number of large firms and monopolistic competition contains a large number of small firms. The dividing line between oligopoly and monopolistic competition can be blurred due to the number of firms in the industry.

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