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OPEN ECONOMY: An economy with a great deal of foreign trade. At the extreme, a completely open economy is one that has no trade barriers. Most of the world's hundred-plus nations are relatively open, but much less than they could be because of a wide assortment of trade restrictions. The more an economy is open, the more dependent it is on happenings around the world.

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COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION: One of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resource -- that is, the production of one good automatically triggers the production of the other. The terms "joint products" or "by-products" are two terms commonly used for complements-in-production. A complement-in-production is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of supply. The other is a substitute-in-production. An increase in the price of one complement-in-production causes a increase in supply of the other. Complements-in-production are goods produced jointly from the same resource or input. This typically happens when the resource in question has parts that can be separated into different products. One example is the production of two goods -- beef and leather -- from one resource -- cattle. Another complement in production example is lumber and sawdust, both produced from a single tree.

     See also | complement | supply | production | supply curve | other prices | supply shock | supply determinants | complement-in-consumption | joint product | by-product |


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AGGREGATE DEMAND AND MARKET DEMAND

The aggregate demand curve, or AD curve, has similarities to, but differences from, the standard market demand curve. Both are negatively sloped. Both relate price and quantity. However, the market demand curve is negatively sloped because of the income and substitution effects and the aggregate demand curve is negatively sloped because of the real-balance, interest-rate, and net-export effects.

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