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ABSOLUTE ADVANTAGE: The general ability to produced more goods using fewer resources. This idea of absolute advantage is important for trading that occurs between both people and nations. A nation can get an absolute advantage from an advanced level of technology or higher quality resources. For a person, an absolute advantage can result from natural abilities or the acquisition of human capital (education, training, or experience).

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COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION: One of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resource -- that is, the production of one good automatically triggers the production of the other. The terms "joint products" or "by-products" are two terms commonly used for complements-in-production. A complement-in-production is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of supply. The other is a substitute-in-production. An increase in the price of one complement-in-production causes a increase in supply of the other. Complements-in-production are goods produced jointly from the same resource or input. This typically happens when the resource in question has parts that can be separated into different products. One example is the production of two goods -- beef and leather -- from one resource -- cattle. Another complement in production example is lumber and sawdust, both produced from a single tree.

     See also | complement | supply | production | supply curve | other prices | supply shock | supply determinants | complement-in-consumption | joint product | by-product |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT

The notion that an increase in saving, which is generally good advice for an individual during bad economic times, can actually worsen the macroeconomy causing a reduction in aggregate income, production, and paradoxically a decrease in saving. The paradox of thrift is an example of the fallacy of composition stating that what is true for the part is not necessarily true for the whole.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials looking to buy either semi-gloss photo paper that works with your neighbor's printer or a birthday gift for your father that doesn't look like every other birthday gift for your father. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
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The wealthy industrialist, Andrew Carnegie, was once removed from a London tram because he lacked the money needed for the fare.
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