Google
Tuesday 
January 31, 2023 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
HOUSEHOLD SECTOR: The basic macroeconomic sector that includes the entire, wants and-needs-satisfying population of the economy. The household sector is the eating, breathing, consuming population of the economy. In a word "everyone," all consumers, all people. This sector includes everyone seeking to satisfy unlimited wants and needs. While it's called "household" sector, this doesn't require that you own a house, live in a house, or even know someone has ever seen a house to be included. The term household sector is merely a short-cut used by economists to indicate the consuming, wants-and-needs-satisfying population.

Visit the GLOSS*arama


COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION:

One of two (or more) goods that are simultaneously produced using a given resource. A complement-in-production is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of supply. The other is a substitute-in-production. An increase in the price of one complement good causes an increase in supply for the other.
Complements-in-production are two or more goods that are jointly produced using a given resource. The production of one good automatically triggers the production of another, often as a bi-product. Both goods are simultaneously produced from the same resource. The production of one good does not exclude the production of the other, as would be the case for substitutes-in-production. In fact, it promotes the production of the other. Produce one, produce both.

Agricultural producers frequently generate bi-products when they produce a primary good, such as wheat and hay. Cattle ranchers produce both beef and leather from the same cattle resource. Lumber mills use timber resources to the produce two-by-fours and sawdust.

The price of a complement-in-production is part of the other prices supply determinant. A change in the price of a complement-in-production causes a change in supply and a shift of the supply curve. An increase in the price of one complement good causes an increase in the supply of the other. A decrease in the price of one complement good causes a decrease in the supply of the other.

Shifting the Supply Curve

To illustrate this process consider the simultaneous production of two goods--beef and leather. Each is jointly produced using the same cattle resources. When producers produce one, they produce both.

Complement-in-Production
Leather


How is the supply of leather affected if the price of beef should change?

  • A Higher Price: Suppose the price of beef increases. Profit-minded cattle ranchers undoubtedly react according to the law of supply and increase the quantity supplied of beef. However, in that this generates leather as a bi-product, more leather is automatically produced. The result is an increase in the supply of leather and a rightward shift of the supply curve. Click the [Price Increase] button to demonstrate.

  • A Lower Price: Suppose the price of beef decreases. Profit-minded cattle ranchers also likely react according to the law of supply and decrease the quantity supplied of beef. However, now there is less leather generated as a bi-product, with less leather automatically produced. The result is a decrease in the supply of leather and a leftward shift of the supply curve. Click the [Price Decrease] button to demonstrate.

<= COMPLEMENT-IN-CONSUMPTIONCOMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY =>


Recommended Citation:

COMPLEMENT-IN-PRODUCTION, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: January 31, 2023].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | substitute-in-production | complement good | substitute good | substitute-in-consumption | complement-in-consumption | other prices, supply determinant | supply determinants |


Or For A Little Background...

     | supply | market supply | supply price | quantity supplied | law of supply | supply curve | change in supply | change in quantity supplied | ceteris paribus |


And For Further Study...

     | market | Marshallian cross | comparative statics | competition | competitive market | producer surplus | other prices, demand determinant | demand determinants |


Search Again?

Back to the WEB*pedia


APLS

RED AGGRESSERINE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at an auction trying to buy either shoe laces for your snow boots or a rim for your spare tire. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Potato chips were invented in 1853 by a irritated chef repeatedly seeking to appease the hard to please Cornelius Vanderbilt who demanded french fried potatoes that were thinner and crisper than normal.
"To understand a man, you must know his memories. The same is true of a nation."

-- Anthony Quayle, Actor

IIP
Index of Industrial Production
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2023 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster