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ACCOUNTING COST: The actual outlays or expenses incurred in production that shows up a firm's accounting statements or records. Accounting costs, while very important to accountants, company CEOs, shareholders, and the Internal Revenue Service, is only minimally important to economists. The reason is that economists are primarily interested in economic cost (also called opportunity cost). That fact is that accounting costs and economic costs aren't always the same. An opportunity or economic cost is the value of foregone production. Some economic costs, actually a lot of economic opportunity costs, never show up as accounting costs. Moreover, some accounting costs, while legal, bonified payments by a firm, are not associated with any sort of opportunity cost.

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ELASTICITY ALTERNATIVES: Five categories of elasticity that form a continuum indicating the relatively responsiveness of a change in one variable (usually quantity demanded or quantity supplied) to a change in another variable (usually demand price or supply price). These five alternatives--perfectly elastic, relatively elastic, unit elastic, relatively inelastic, and perfectly inelastic--are most often are used to categorize the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply.

     See also | elasticity | elastic | inelastic | relatively inelastic | perfectly inelastic | relatively elastic | unit elastic | perfectly elastic | elasticity alternatives, demand | elasticity alternatives, supply | coefficient of elasticity | elasticity determinants |


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PRIVATE PROPERTY

An economic institution in which goods, resources, commodities, or other assets (property) are owned and controlled by households and businesses (the private sector) rather than government (the public sector). Private property is a key institution, along with individual freedom and competitive markets, that helps to form the structure of capitalism.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store hoping to buy either a how-to book on surfing the Internet or a computer that can play music and burn CDs. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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It's estimated that the U.S. economy has about $20 million of counterfeit currency in circulation, less than 0.001 perecent of the total legal currency.
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