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May 26, 2022 

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YTM: The common abbreviation for yield to maturity, which is the annual rate of return on a financial asset that is held until maturity. Yield to maturity depends on both the coupon rate and the face or par value paid at maturity. If the selling price of a financial asset is equal to its par value, then the yield to maturity is equal to the current yield and the coupon rate. However, if the asset is selling at a discount, then the yield to maturity exceeds the current yield, which is greater than the coupon rate. And if the asset is selling at a premium, then the yield to maturity is less than the current yield, which is below than the coupon rate.

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FACE VALUE: The stated, or face, value of a legal claim or financial asset. For debt securities, such as corporate bonds or U. S. Treasury securities, this is amount to be repaid at the time of maturity. For equity securities, that is, corporate stocks, this is the initial value set up at the time it is issued. Face value, also called par value, is not necessarily, and often is not, equal to the current market price of the asset. A $10,000 U.S. Treasury note, for example, has a face value of $10,000, but might have a current market price of $9,950. The difference between face value and current price contributes to the yield or return on such assets. An asset is selling at a discount if the current price is less than the face value and is selling at a premium if the current price is more than the par value.

     See also | legal claim | financial asset | corporate bond | Treasury security | corporate stock | maturity | yield | discount | premium | yield to maturity | coupon rate | current yield | present value |


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FACE VALUE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: May 26, 2022].


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REVENUE EFFECT

The generation of revenue used to finance government operations that results from placing taxes on economic activity. The revenue effect is the primary reason that governments impose taxes on members of society. Without the revenue generated from taxes, governments could not provided valuable and essential public goods nor undertake other government operations. This is one of two effects of taxation. The other is the allocation effect, which is the change in resource allocation that results because taxes create disincentives to produce, consume, and exchange.

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The earliest known use of paper currency was about 1270 in China during the rule of Kubla Khan.
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