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November 30, 2022 

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QUALITY OF LIFE: A common term used to indicate the overall level of well-being or welfare of a person or group of people, taking into account both monetary and non-monetary factors. This notion is theoretically synonymous with utility and the satisfaction of wants and needs. However, from a practical standpoint, attempts have been made to measure the quality of life, primarily as a means of comparison between communities. Quality of life measures are composite indexes based on monetary factors such as income, wages, living costs, and taxes, combined with non-monetary factors such as crime rate, air quality, and education level.

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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

     See also | rate of return | interest rate | asset | commercial paper | corporate bond | government security | price | financial markets |


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MARGINAL COST

The change in total cost (or total variable cost) resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Marginal cost (MC) indicates how much total cost changes for a given change in the quantity of output. Because changes in total cost are matched by changes in total variable cost in the short run (total fixed cost is fixed), marginal cost is the change in either total cost or total variable cost. It is found by dividing the change in total cost (or total variable cost) by the change in output. Marginal cost is one of four cost concepts used in short-run production analysis. The other three are average total cost, average fixed cost, and average variable cost.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway looking to buy either a flower arrangement for your aunt or a birthday greeting card for your uncle. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
"Consult not your fears, but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do. "

-- Pope John XXIII

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