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July 16, 2024 

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KEIRETSU: A form of business structure common in Japan which involves an alliance of several businesses, each working toward the mutual success of the group. The alliance also has close ties to government. Each "independent" business owns stock in the others and shares executives and directors. Keiretsu can be either horizontally or vertically integrated. Horizontal keiretsu cluster around a major bank with business ventures in a wide variety of industries. Vertical keiretsu contain businesses in all production phases of a particular industry, from raw materials to production to marketing.

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FACTOR SUPPLY: The willingness and ability of scarce resources or factors of production to offer their services for use in productive activities. Like other types of supply, factor supply relates price and quantity. Specifically, factor supply is the range of factor quantities that are supplied at a range of factor prices. This is one half of the factor market. The other half is factor demand. The factors of production subject to factor supply include any and all of the four scarce resources--labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship. However, because labor involves human beings directly, it is the factor that tends to receive the most scrutiny and analysis.

     See also | factors of production | factor market | supply | factor price | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | factor supply curve | factor demand |


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FACTOR SUPPLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: July 16, 2024].


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LIQUIDITY

The ease with which an asset can be converted to money with little or no loss of value. Money, currency and checkable deposits, is the benchmark for liquidity. Money is what other assets are converted to. Different assets have differing degrees of liquidity. Financial assets have differing degrees of liquidity but tend to be more liquid that physical assets. Liquidity is important to components of the three monetary aggregates tracked and reported by the Federal Reserve System--M1, M2, and M3.

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