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February 24, 2024 

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DI: The abbreviation for disposable income,which is the total income that can be used by the household sector for either consumption or saving during a given period of time, usually one year. This is the income left over after income taxes and social security taxes are removed and government transfer payments, like welfare, social security benefits, or unemployment compensation are added. Because consumption and saving are important to our economy for short-run stability and long-run growth, pointy-headed economists like to keep a close eye on disposable personal income. Disposable income is reported quarterly (every three months) in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

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FACTOR DEMAND: The willingness and ability of productive activities (that is, businesses) to hire or employ factors of production. Like other types of demand, factor demand relates the price and quantity. Specifically, factor demand is the range of factor quantities that are demanded at a range of factor prices. This is one half of the factor market. The other half is factor supply. The factors of production subject to factor demand include any and all of the four scarce resources--labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship. However, because labor involves human beings directly, it is the factor that tends to receive the most scrutiny and analysis.

     See also | factors of production | factor market | factor price | demand | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | factor demand curve | factor demand determinants | factor supply | factor demand and marginal revenue product |


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FACTOR DEMAND, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: February 24, 2024].


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PEAK

The transition of a business-cycle expansion to a business-cycle contraction. The end of an expansion carries this descriptive term of peak, or the highest level of economic reached in recent times. A peak is one of two turning points. The other, the transition from contraction to expansion, is a trough. Turning points are important because they represent the transition from bad to good or good to bad.

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APLS

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a birthday greeting card for your uncle or a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Presidential election. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
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Much of the $15 million used by the United States to finance the Louisiana Purchase from France was borrowed from European banks.
"In war, there is no second prize for the runner-up."

-- Omar Bradley, US Army general

FED
Federal Reserve
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