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February 8, 2023 

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ANTITRUST: The generally process of preventing monopoly practices or breaking up monopolies that restrict competition. The term antitrust derives from the common use of the trust organizational structure in the late 1800s and early 1900s to monopolize markets. The most noted example of the use of a monopoly trust was the Standard Oil Trust, controlled by J. D. Rockefeller and dismantled through the Sherman Act in 1911. The creation of similar monopoly trusts led to the several antitrust laws, including the Sherman Act, the Clayton Act, and the Federal Trade Commission Act.

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FRICTIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT: Unemployment attributable to the time required to match production activities with qualified resources. Frictional unemployment essentially occurs because resources, especially labor, are in the process of moving from one production activity to another. Employers are seeking workers and workers are seeking employment, the two sides just haven't matched up. Hence unemployment of the frictional variety increases. This mismatch is largely the result of limited information, which is often compounded by geographic separation between producer and resource. Frictional unemployment is one of four unemployment sources. The other three are cyclical unemployment, seasonal unemployment, and structural unemployment.

     See also | unemployment | cyclical unemployment | seasonal unemployment | structural unemployment | natural unemployment | efficiency | information |


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FRICTIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: February 8, 2023].


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FEDERAL FUNDS RATE

The interest rate charged by one commercial bank or depository institution for lending Federal Reserve deposits to another commercial bank or depository institution. This is the interest rate determined in the Federal funds market. The Federal funds rate is a key interest rate for both the banking system and the macroeconomy. It is often targeted by monetary policy and is a benchmark used to determine other interest rates in the economy.

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