Google
Wednesday 
November 30, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
AD: The abbreviation for aggregate demand, which is the total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

GOVERNMENT FUNCTIONS: Activities that are more efficiently performed by government than by private sector households and business. In fact, historical evidence (that is, 10,000 years of civilization--more or less) strongly indicates that we, regularly human-being-type people, are willing to put of with the coercive shenanigans of government (taxes, laws, regulations, abuse of power, oppression of the masses, meaningless wars) only because government does perform useful functions. Fire is the best analogy for government. When raging out of control both fire and government can cause horrific devastation. But when controlled, both can provide unparalleled good.

     See also | government | government sector | household sector | business sector | foreign sector | regulation | economic policies | taxes | private sector | public sector |


Recommended Citation:

GOVERNMENT FUNCTIONS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: November 30, 2022].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: government functions

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

LABOR FORCE

The total number of people in an economy, society, or country willing and able to exert mental and/or physical efforts in productive activities. The labor force is a more technical term for the labor resource or labor supply. It includes both employed workers and unemployed workers. An official variation of this term is civilian labor force. While labor force may or may not include military personnel, the civilian labor force explicitly excludes the military. Labor and labor resources are the theoretical terms that economists like to banter about. Labor force and civilian labor force are the terms of choice for government policy makers, data-crunchers, and others who need precise labor resource numbers.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

GREEN LOGIGUIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for rummage sales seeking to buy either a how-to book on fixing your computer, with illustrations or several magazines on computer software. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"Consult not your fears, but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do. "

-- Pope John XXIII

CIF
Cost, Insurance, Freight
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster