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March 28, 2023 

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RIGHT TO WORK: A law preventing employers from making union membership a condition of employment. In other words, your boss can't forced you to join a union if you don't want to. There are two sides to this argument. On the one hand, workers should have the freedom to join a union or not based on the benefit to had from the union and perhaps their philosophical orientation towards unions. On the other hand, unions gain their strength by representing workers. Its negotiating position is hurt if it represents only a fraction of the workers. Moreover, any benefits a union gets for workers are enjoyed by its members (who pay dues) as well as nonmembers (who don't pay dues).

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REGULATION: Government rules or laws that control the activities of businesses and consumers. The motivation for regulation is that businesses are inclined to do things that are harmful to the public--actions which need to be prevented or otherwise controlled. Regulation is essentially an extension of government's authority to protect one member of society from another. It tends to take one of two forms--(1) industry regulation that's intended to prevent firms from gaining and abusing excessive market control and (2) social regulation that seeks to protect consumers for problems caused by pollution, unsafe products, and the lack of information (market failure).

     See also | government | government functions | public sector | public goods | regulatory policy | second estate | industry regulation | social regulation | market control | pollution | market failure | information | antitrust laws | taxes | price ceiling | price floor | regulation, capture theory | deregulation |


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TOTAL REVENUE CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the total revenue received by a perfectly competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. It is combined with a perfectly competitive firm's total cost curve to determine economic profit and the profit maximizing level of production. The slope of the total revenue curve is marginal revenue.

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ORANGE REBELOON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store seeking to buy either a brown leather attache case or car battery jumper cables. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."

-- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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