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November 30, 2022 

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SECOND RULE OF SUBJECTIVITY: The second of seven basic rules of the economy. It is the notion that market prices are ultimately determined by subjective values and preferences of buyers and resource owners. While regular, everyday consumers are prone to accept the prices "set" by retail stores and other sellers as etched in stone (perhaps along with the Biblical ten commandments), such is not the case. The price of a product depends on two things, demand (especially the demand price that buyers are willing to pay) and supply (especially the supply price that sellers are willing to accept). Both, I repeat both, are subjectively determined. By subjective, I mean they are based on the values, beliefs, tastes, and preferences of people.

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PUBLIC GOODS: Goods that are difficult to keep nonpayers from consuming (excludability), and use of the goods by one person doesn't prevent use by others (rival consumption). Examples include national defense, a clean environment, and any fourth of July fireworks display. Public goods are invariably provided by government because there's no way a private business can profitably produce them. Private businesses can't sell public goods in markets, because they can't charge a price and keep nonpaying people away. Moreover, businesses shouldn't charge a price, because there's no opportunity cost for extra consumers. For efficiency, government needs to pay for public goods through taxes.

     See also | good types | excludability | rival consumption | efficiency | market | exchange | market failure | common-property good | near-public good | private good | free-rider problem |


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PUBLIC GOODS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: November 30, 2022].


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BANK LIABILITIES

What a bank owes, including most notably customer deposits. Bank liabilities are typically listed on the right-hand side of a bank's balance sheet. Bank assets, what a bank owns, are listed on the left-hand side of a bank's balance sheet. Net worth is the difference between assets and liabilities. The most important liability category of most bank is checkable deposits, which is part of the economy's M1 money supply. The largest liability category includes other types of deposits (especially savings deposits, certificates of deposit, and money market deposits) that enter into the M2 and M3 monetary aggregates.

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