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POLLUTION TYPES: Pollution residuals fall into one of three categories--degradable, nondegradeable, and persistent. Damage done by each type, and thus external cost, typically varies. At one extreme are degradable residuals and at the other are nondegradable. In the middle are persistent residuals.

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MARKET: The organized exchange of commodities (goods, services, or resources) between buyers and sellers within a specific geographic area and during a given period of time. Markets are the exchange between buyers who want a good--the demand-side of the market--and the sellers who have it--the supply--side of the market. In essence, a buyer gives up money and gets a good, while a seller gives up a good and gets money. From a marketing context, in order to be a market the following conditions must exist. The target consumers must have the ability to purchase the goods or services. They must have a need or desire to purchase. The target group must be willing to exchange something of value for the product. Finally, they must have the authority to make the purchase. If all these variables are present, a market exits.

     See also | exchange | goods | services | scarcity | resource allocation | three questions of allocation | demand | supply | price | quantity | equilibrium | production | consumption | capitalism | market-oriented economy | comparative statics | demand shock | supply shock | competitive market | equilibrium price | equilibrium quantity | barter | market adjustment | market clearing | market control | market failure | marketing mix | product | consumer behavior | target market | marketing plan |


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MARKET, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 26, 2022].


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MARGINAL COST AND LAW OF DIMINISHING MARGINAL RETURNS

Decreasing then increasing marginal cost, reflected by a U-shaped marginal cost curve, is the result of increasing then decreasing marginal returns. In particular the decreasing marginal returns is caused by the law of diminishing marginal returns. As such, the law of diminishing marginal returns affects not only the short-run production of a firm but also the cost of short-run production. This translates into a positively-sloped supply curve for profit-maximizing competitive firms.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time touring the new suburban shopping complex trying to buy either a half-dozen helium filled balloons or a packet of address labels large enough for addresses of both the sender and the recipient. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
"It has been my philosophy of life that difficulties vanish when faced boldly. "

-- Isaac Asimov

MRS
Marginal Rate of Substitution
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