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RISK POOLING: Combining the uncertainty of individuals into a calculable risk for large groups. For example, you may or may not contract the flu this year. However, if you're thrown in with 99,999 other people, then health-care types who spend their lives measuring the odds of an illness, can predict that 1 percent of the group, or 1,000 people, will get the flu. The uncertainty is that they probably don't know which 1,000 people, they only know the number afflicted. This little bit of information is what makes risk pooling possible. If the cost is $50 per illness, then an insurance company can insure your 100,000-member group against flu if they collect $50,000 ($50 x 1,000 sick people), or 50 cents per person. By agreeing to pay the cost of each sick person in exchange for the 50 cent payments, the insurance company has effectively pooled the risk of the group.

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INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS: A branch of economics that studies economic interactions among different countries, including foreign trade (exports and imports), foreign exchange (trading currency), balance of payments, and balance of trade. While much of the interaction among countries is largely an extension of basic economic principles, complications do arise because nations are distinct political entities, with different laws and cultures, and with little or no overall governmental oversight. The guiding principle in the study of international economics is comparative advantage, which indicates that every country, no matter their level of development, can find something that it can produce cheaper than another country. The study of interational economics focusses on two related areas -- international trade and international finance

     See also | international trade | international finance | balance of trade | balance of payments | comparative advantage | foreign | domestic |


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INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: May 21, 2024].


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SLOPE, LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE

The long-run aggregate supply (LRAS) curve is a vertical line with an infinite slope, reflecting the independent relation between the price level and aggregate real production. A higher price level is associated with the same real production as a lower price level. This is the real production generated when resources are fully employed, that is, full-employment production.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites wanting to buy either blue cotton balls or a genuine down-filled pillow. Be on the lookout for gnomes hiding in cypress trees.
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Helping spur the U.S. industrial revolution, Thomas Edison patented nearly 1300 inventions, 300 of which came out of his Menlo Park "invention factory" during a four-year period.
"Carpe diem! Rejoice while you are alive; enjoy the day; live life to the fullest; make the most of what you have. It is later than you think."

-- Horace, Ancient Roman poet

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