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February 9, 2023 

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COMPOUND INTEREST: Interest that's added to a principal at regular intervals such that each subsequent interest calculation is based on the original principal and the added interest. For example, suppose you have a $100 savings account that pays 5 percent interest. Without compound interest, such that your 5 percent interest is paid only at the end of a year, you will have exactly $105 in one year. However, if your interest is compounded each month you end up with $105.12 after a year. The extra 12 cents comes from interest on the interest paid the first month, interest on the interest paid the second month, interest on the interest paid the third month... well I could go on.

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LIQUIDITY: The ease of converting an asset into money (either checking accounts or currency) in a timely fashion with little or no loss in value. Money is the standard for liquidity because it is, well, money and no conversion is needed. Other assets, both financial and physical have varying degrees of liquidity. Savings accounts, certificates of deposit, and money market accounts are highly liquid. Stocks, bonds, and are another step down in liquidity. While they can be "cashed in," price fluctuations, brokerage fees, and assorted transactions expenses tend to reduce their money value. Physical assets, like houses, cars, furniture, clothing, food, and the like have substantially less liquidity.

     See also | money | asset | value | checkable deposits | currency | M1 | corporate stock | bond | government securities |


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LIQUIDITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: February 9, 2023].


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ELASTICITY ALTERNATIVES, SUPPLY

Five categories of the price elasticity of supply that reflect the entire range of the relative responsiveness of a change in quantity supplied to a change in price. These five alternatives--perfectly elastic, relatively elastic, unit elastic, relatively inelastic, and perfectly inelastic--are often illustrated by different supply curves. The price elasticity of demand is also reflected by five comparable alternatives.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time driving to a factory outlet wanting to buy either a birthday gift for your grandmother or a T-shirt commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
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