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June 17, 2024 

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REGULATORY FORCES: Forces in the marketing environment that depend on various government regulatory agencies that impact how an organization operates on a daily basis. An example is the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which monitors advertising, deceptive labeling, and false or misleading information. Agencies such as the FTC have powers to enforce regulations through fines and other penalties. Other regulatory agencies are: Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

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MONOPOLY AND DEMAND: The demand for the output produced by a monopoly is THE market demand for the good. This should be compared with the demand facing a perfectly competitive firm. The demand curve for the output produced by a perfectly competitive firm is perfectly elastic, it is horizontal at the going market price. This is what makes a perfectly competitive firm a price taker. It must "take" whatever price is set in the overall market. Facing a downward-sloping demand curve, however, makes a monopoly a price maker. It has a great deal of control over the market and the market price. IT IS THE MARKET!

     See also | monopoly | demand | demand curve | law of demand | perfect competition | price maker | price taker | market control |


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MONOPOLY AND DEMAND, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: June 17, 2024].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND DECREASE, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET

A shock to the short-run aggregate market caused by a decrease in aggregate demand, resulting in and illustrated by a leftward shift of the aggregate demand curve. A decrease in aggregate demand in the short-run aggregate market results in a decrease in the price level and a decrease in real production. The level of real production resulting from the shock can be greater or less than full-employment real production.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale trying to buy either a toaster oven that has convection cooking or a birthday gift for your mother. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us. "

-- E. M. Forster, writer

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