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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST: The change in the long-run total cost of producing a good or service resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced. Like all marginals, long-run marginal cost is the increment in the corresponding total. What's most notable about long-run marginal cost, however, is that we are operating in the long run. Unlike the short run, in which at least one input is fixed, there are no fixed inputs in the long run. As such, there is only variable cost. This means that long-run marginal cost is the result of changes in the cost of all inputs.

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NATIONAL INCOME: The total income earned by the citizens of the national economy as a result of their ownership of resources used in the production of final goods and services during a given period of time, usually one year. This is the government's official measure of how much income is generated by the economy. National income, generally abbreviated as NI, is the broadest, most comprehensive of three income measures reported quarterly (every three months) in the National Income and Product Accounts by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

     See also | income | resources | production | personal income | disposable income | gross domestic product | net domestic product | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis |


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NONPAYER EXCLUDABILITY

Whether or not nonpayers can be excluded from consuming a good. In other words, can those who do not pay for a good be excluded from consuming the good. Nonpayer excludability is based on the ability to possess and transfer property rights or ownership of a good. For some goods, nonpayers can be easily excluded from consumption because property rights are well-defined and easily controlled. For other goods nonpayers cannot be easily excluded from consumption because property rights are not well-defined and cannot be easily controlled. When combined with consumption rivalry, the result is four alternative types of goods -- private, public, common-property, and near-public.

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