Google
Wednesday 
February 28, 2024 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

RESOURCES: The labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship used by society to produce consumer satisfying goods and services. Land provides the basic raw materials--vegetation, animals, minerals, fossil fuels--that are inputs into the production of goods (natural resources). Labor is the resource that does the "hands on" work of transforming raw materials into goods. Capital is the comprehensive term for the vast array of tools, equipment, buildings, and vehicles used in production. Entrepreneurship is the resource that undertakes the risk of bringing the other resources together and initiating the production process.

     See also | factors of production | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | risk | natural resources | scarcity | opportunity cost | satisfaction | production | consumption | goods | services | wants and needs | limited resources | unlimited wants and needs | scarce | scarce resource | scarce good | free resource | free good |


Recommended Citation:

RESOURCES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: February 28, 2024].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: resources

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

PERFECT COMPETITION, REVENUE DIVISION

The marginal approach to analyzing a perfectly competitive firm's short-run profit maximizing production decision can be used to identify the division of total revenue among variable cost, fixed cost, and economic profit. The U-shaped cost curves used in this analysis provide all of the information needed on the cost side of the firm's decision. The demand curve facing the firm (which is also the firm's average revenue and marginal revenue curves) provides all of the information needed on the revenue side.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

BROWN PRAGMATOX
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction seeking to buy either a weathervane with a cow on top or a box of multi-colored, plastic paper clips. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Sixty percent of big-firm executives said the cover letter is as important or more important than the resume itself when you're looking for a new job
"Always make a total effort, even when the odds are against you."

-- Arnold Palmer

R&D
Research and Development
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2024 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster