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August 18, 2022 

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RESOURCE QUANTITY, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of three categories of aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the short-run and long-run aggregate supply curves are constructed, and which shifts both aggregate supply curves when it changes. An increase in a resource quantity causes an increase (rightward shift) of both aggregate supply curves. A decrease in a resource quantity causes a decrease (leftward shift) of both aggregate supply curves. The other two categories of aggregate supply determinants are resource quality and resource price. Specific determinants falling into this general category include population, labor force participation, capital stock, and exploration. Anything affecting the quantity of labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship is also included.

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OUTSIDE LAG: In the context of economic policies, the time between corrective government action responding to a shock to the economy and the resulting affect on the economy. This is one of two primary lags in the use of economic policies. The other is inside lag, the time between a shock to the economy and corrective government action responding to the shock. The length of the outside lag, also termed impact lag, is primarily based on the speed of the multiplier process and is essentially the same for both fiscal and monetary policy. The length of the inside and outside lags is one argument against the use of discretionary policies to stability business cycles.

     See also | economic policies | policy lags | inside lag | business cycle | multiplier | circular flow |


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KINKED-DEMAND CURVE

A demand curve with two distinct segments which have different elasticities that join to form a corner or kink. The primary use of the kinked-demand curve is to explain price rigidity in oligopoly. The two segments are: (1) a relatively more elastic segment for price increases and (2) a relatively less elastic segment for price decreases. The relative elasticities of these two segments is based on the interdependent decision-making of oligopolistic firms.

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