Google
Wednesday 
December 7, 2022 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FIXED FACTOR OF PRODUCTION: An input whose quantity cannot be changed in the time period under consideration. This usually goes by the shorter term fixed input and should be immediately compared and contrasted with variable factor of production, which goes by the shorter term variable input. The most common example of a fixed factor of production is capital. A fixed factor of production provides the "capacity" constraint for the short-run production of a firm. As larger quantities of a variable factor of production, like labor, are added to a fixed factor of production like capital, the variable input becomes less productive. This is, by the way, the law of diminishing marginal returns. For more detailed discussion, take a look at the shorter, more commonly used alias of fixed factor of production, which is fixed input.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

SALES MAXIMIZATION: The notion that business firms (especially those operating in the real world) are primarily motivated by the desire to achieve the greatest possible level of sales, rather than profit maximization. On a day-to-day basis, most real world firms probably do try to maximize sales rather than profit. For firms operating in relatively competitive markets, facing relative fixed prices, and relatively constant average cost, then increasing sales is bound to increase profits, too. Moreover, according to the notion of natural selection, even firms that seek to maximize sales, those that also maximize profit will remain in business.

     See also | firm objectives | profit maximization | utility maximization | natural selection |


Recommended Citation:

SALES MAXIMIZATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: December 7, 2022].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION, EFFICIENCY

A monopolistically competitive firm generally produces less output and charges a higher price than would be the case for a perfectly competitive firm. In particular, the price charged by a monopolistically competitive firm is higher than the marginal cost of production, which violates the efficiency condition that price equals marginal cost. A monopolistically competitive firm is inefficient because it has market control and faces a negatively-sloped demand curve.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PURPLE SMARPHIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling through a department store hoping to buy either a replacement nozzle for your shower or a decorative windchime with plastic . Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

General Electric is the only stock from the original 1896 Dow Jones Industrial Average remaining in the current index.
"Use, do not abuse; neither abstinence nor excess ever renders man happy."

-- Voltaire, philosopher

OTC
Over the Counter
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2022 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster