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April 16, 2024 

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HARROD-DOMAR MODEL: A model economic growth developed by R. F. Harrod and E. D. Domar that seeks to explain why an economy would not grow as fast has its potential growth rate. This model is based on the notion that actual income determines the amount saving, which is determines investment, which is what affects the rate of economic growth. If saving is not enough, the potential growth rate will not be achieved. The Harrod-Domar model, developed in the 1930s, has a strong Keynesian economic flavor, both indicating that the economy does not automatically achieve its potential.

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THRIFT INSTITUTIONS: Non-profit depository financial institutions that were originally established to provide limited banking services, often to specific groups, that were not adequately offered by traditional banks. The three primary thrift institutions are credit unions, savings and loan associations, and mutual savings banks. In recent decades these thrift institutions have broaden the range of financial services, especially offering checkable deposits, and thus operate as banks. In particular, that come under the same monetary policy regulation as traditional banks.

     See also | banking | banks | savings and loan associations | credit unions | mutual savings banks | traditional banks | fractional-reserve banking |


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IMPERFECT COMPETITION

Markets or industries with two or more sellers and buyers that fail to match the criteria of perfect competition. The most noted examples of imperfect competition are the two market structures with selling-side control--monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Lesser known market structures with buying-side control--monopsonistic competition and oligopsony--are also considered as imperfect competition. Facing no competition, monopoly and monopsony are not included. Most real world markets can be considered imperfect competition.

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