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January 23, 2022 

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WEIGHT: When applied to location theory, the relative attractive force of one activity to another based on transportation cost. The weight of an activity in this context is comparable to the weight of matter subject to gravitation forces. The weight of an activity is greater if it incurs higher transportation cost. As such, it is attracted, or pulled, to other activities to reduce transportation cost. With the weight (transportation cost) of an activity is often related to physical weight (heavier items cost more to move), it need not be. Other factors affecting weight include special handling (security, comfort) and type of transportation (walking, automobile, airplane).

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TOTAL FIXED COST: Cost of production that does NOT change with changes in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Total fixed cost is one part of total cost. The other is total variable cost. At any and all levels of output, fixed cost is the same. It doesn't change. This includes cost that is not dependent on, or unrelated to, production. The best way to identify fixed cost is to produce zero output. Fixed cost is incurred whether or not any output is produced. A cost measure directly related to total fixed cost is average fixed cost.

     See also | total cost | fixed cost | fixed input | total variable cost | average fixed cost | quantity |


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TOTAL FIXED COST, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 23, 2022].


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MARKET STRUCTURE CONTINUUM

The four common market structures, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, can be viewed as a continuum based on (1) differences in the number of firms in a market, (2) the relative size of each firm, and thus (3) the market control of each firm. Perfect competition lies at one end and monopoly at the other. Monopolistic competition is close to perfect competition and oligopoly is near monopoly. The essence of the continuum is that monopolistic competition blends into oligopoly, with no clear-cut line of separation.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market wanting to buy either a pair of red and purple designer socks or a T-shirt commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
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