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RESOURCE PRICE, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of three categories of aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the aggregate supply curve is constructed, and which shifts the aggregate supply curve when it changes. An increase in a resource price causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. A decrease in a resource price causes an increase (rightward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. The other two categories of aggregate supply determinants are resource quantity and resource quality. Specific determinants falling into this general category include wages and energy prices. Anything affecting the prices paid for the use of labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship is also included.

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FIXED COST: In general, cost that does not change with changes in the quantity of output produced. More specifically, fixed cost is combined with the adjectives "total" and "average" to indicate the overall level of fixed cost or the per unit fixed cost. Fixed cost is incurred whether of not any output is produced. The same fixed cost is incurred at any and all output levels. This means that total fixed cost is, in fact, FIXED. However, it also means that average fixed cost, or fixed cost per unit, declines as the output level increases. Spreading out $100 over 1,000 units gives a lower per unit fixed cost that spreading out $100 over 10 units.

     See also | opportunity cost | total cost | total fixed cost | average fixed cost | variable cost | fixed input | variable input | short-run production |


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SAVING FUNCTION

A mathematical relation between saving and income by the household sector. The saving function can be stated as an equation, usually a simple linear equation, or as a diagram designated as the saving line. This function captures the saving-income relation, the flip side of the consumption-income relation that forms one of the key building blocks for Keynesian economics. The two key parameters of the saving function are the intercept term, which indicates autonomous saving, and the slope, which is the marginal propensity to save and indicates induced saving. The injections-leakages model used in Keynesian economics is based on the saving function.

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