March 23, 2018 

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PREFERRED STOCK: The ownership shares in a corporation that have legal claim to the corporation's assets. Stock is usually dividend into two types, common stock and preferred stock. Preferred stock has first claim to the corporations net assets, and common stock comes in second. However, if a corporation has no preferred stock, the common stock has exclusive claim. Most stocks are negotiable and are traded one on a stock market.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • What It Is
  • Price Level
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Two Options
  • Time Periods
  • Long Run
  • Short Run
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curves
  • Long Run
  • Short Run
  • Market Supply
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Stability
  • Long-Run Supply
  • Quantity of Resources
  • Quality of Resources
  • Short-Run Supply
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Connections
  • Self Correction
  • Policies
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Supply

    In much the same way that the market supply lesson parallels the market demand lesson, this lesson on aggregate supply parallels the aggregate demand lesson. Aggregate supply however, is somewhat more involved that market supply, in particular, because aggregate supply is separated into two relations -- on for the short run and one for the long run. This lesson examines the relation between the price level and real production and the determinants that cause a change in aggregate supply, with a close eye on the differences between aggregate supply in the short run and the long run.

    • This lesson begins with an introduction to the aggregate supply half of the aggregate market in the first unit.
    • The second unit then explores the different aggregate supply relations that exist between the price level and real production in the short run and the long run.
    • The third unit introduces the short run aggregate supply curve and the long run aggregate supply curve which capture these two alternative relations.
    • We think pick up the keep curve shifting determinants of aggregate supply in the fourth unit, especially the resource quantity, resource quality, and resource prices.
    • The fifth unit wraps up this lesson with a discussion of the self-correction mechanism that relies on changes in the aggregate supply and how this relates to business cycle stabilization.

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    The opportunity cost incurred per unit of good produced. This is calculated by dividing the cost of production by the quantity of output produced. While average cost is a general term relating cost and the quantity of output, three specific average cost terms are average total cost, average variable cost, and average fixed cost. A related cost term is marginal cost.

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