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A: The common notation for the "intercept" term of an equation specified as Y = a + bX. Mathematically, the a-intercept term indicates the value of the Y variable when the value of the X variable is equal to zero. Theoretically, the a-intercept is frequently used to indicate exogenous or independent influences on the Y variable, that is, influences that are independent of the X variable. For example, if Y represents consumption and X represents national income, a measures autonomous consumption expenditures.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • What It Is
  • Price Level
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Two Options
  • Time Periods
  • Long Run
  • Short Run
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curves
  • Long Run
  • Short Run
  • Market Supply
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Stability
  • Long-Run Supply
  • Quantity of Resources
  • Quality of Resources
  • Short-Run Supply
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Connections
  • Self Correction
  • Policies
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Supply

    In much the same way that the market supply lesson parallels the market demand lesson, this lesson on aggregate supply parallels the aggregate demand lesson. Aggregate supply however, is somewhat more involved that market supply, in particular, because aggregate supply is separated into two relations -- on for the short run and one for the long run. This lesson examines the relation between the price level and real production and the determinants that cause a change in aggregate supply, with a close eye on the differences between aggregate supply in the short run and the long run.

    • This lesson begins with an introduction to the aggregate supply half of the aggregate market in the first unit.
    • The second unit then explores the different aggregate supply relations that exist between the price level and real production in the short run and the long run.
    • The third unit introduces the short run aggregate supply curve and the long run aggregate supply curve which capture these two alternative relations.
    • We think pick up the keep curve shifting determinants of aggregate supply in the fourth unit, especially the resource quantity, resource quality, and resource prices.
    • The fifth unit wraps up this lesson with a discussion of the self-correction mechanism that relies on changes in the aggregate supply and how this relates to business cycle stabilization.

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    SUPPLY SHOCK

    A disruption of market equilibrium caused by a change in a supply determinant and a shift of the supply curve. A supply shock can take one of two forms--a supply increase or a supply decrease. This is one of two disruptions of the market. The other is a demand shock.

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    BROWN PRAGMATOX
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    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store hoping to buy either a wall poster commemorating the 2000 Presidential election or a rechargeable flashlight. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    Woodrow Wilson's portrait adorned the $100,000 bill that was removed from circulation in 1929. Woodrow Wilson was removed from circulation in 1924.
    "Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success. "

    -- Pablo Picasso, artist

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