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June 22, 2018 

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LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE: The proportion of the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over that is in the civilian labor force. The labor force participation rate is essentially the ratio of the civilian labor force to the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over. This ratio indicates the proportion of the available "working age" population that is willing and able to work and is either employed or actively seeking employment.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • What It Is
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Doing More
  • Expenditures
  • Consumption Expenditures
  • Investment Expenditures
  • Government Purchases
  • Net Exports
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Highlights
  • Slope
  • Real-Balance Effect
  • Interest-Rate Effect
  • Net-Export Effect
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Instability
  • Shifts: Increase
  • Shifts: Decrease
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Policies Plus
  • Business Cycles
  • Policies
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Demand

    This lesson introduces aggregate demand, the demand-side of the aggregate market. The aggregate market is the key model used to explain and analyze the workings of the macroeconomy and aggregate demand is a critical half of this model (the other is aggregate supply). Taking a clue from market demand, this lesson examines the nature of aggregate demand, including the relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, the reason the aggregate demand curve is negatively sloped, and the assorted aggregate demand determinants that cause the aggregate demand curve to shift.

    • The first unit of this lesson introduces the concept of aggregate demand and how it fits into the study of macroeconomics in terms of the aggregate market and circular flow.
    • In the second unit, we example the four aggregate expenditures -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports -- the make up aggregate demand.
    • The third unit then examines the aggregate demand curve that captures the aggregate demand relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures, especially the importance of the real-balance, interest-rate, and net-export effects.
    • A look at the assorted aggregate demand determinants that shift the aggregate demand curves is the topic of the fourth lesson.
    • We end this lesson in the fifth unit with a look how demand-management policies work to stabilize business cycles through aggregate demand.

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    LAW OF INCREASING OPPORTUNITY COST

    The proposition that opportunity cost, the value of foregone production, increases as the quantity of a good produced increases. This fundamental economic principles can be seen in the production possibilities schedule and is illustrated graphically through the slope of the production possibilities curve. It generates a distinctive convex shape, flat at the top and steep at the bottom.

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    APLS

    GRAY SKITTERY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale seeking to buy either super soft, super cuddly, stuffed animals or a large stuffed brown and white teddy bear. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    Lombard Street is London's equivalent of New York's Wall Street.
    "Whenever you fall, pick up something. "

    -- Oswald Avery, scientist

    VES
    Variable Elasticity of Substitution
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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