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P-E RATIO: Also termed the price-earnings ratio, this is the ratio of the current price for one share of corporate stock to the earnings (profit) per share of stock. This is used by many financial analysts and investors as an indicator of a company's performance and potential for future growth. A relatively high price-earnings ratio suggests that investors think the company has a great deal of future growth potential. It can also be a sign, however, that the company is seriously overpriced and due for a big drop.

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Lesson 11: Circular Flow | Unit 1: Basic Flow Page: 6 of 22

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  • The circular flow model, which is the continuous production and consumption interaction among the four major sectors-household, business, government, and foreign-- that takes place through the three aggregated macroeconomic markets--product, factor and financial.
  • The basic role of the sectors--household, business, government and foreign--of the economy.
  • The three aggregated markets: (a) Product markets: All markets in the economy that exchange final goods and services. (b) Factor markets: All markets that exchanges the services of the economy's labor resources. (c) Financial markets: All markets that trade financial instruments.
  • The physical flow, which is the counter-clockwise flow of resources from the household to the business sector and of production from the business to the household sector.
  • The payment flow, which is the clockwise flow of payment for resources purchased by the business from the household sector and of payment for production purchased by the household to the business sector.
  • The continuous circular flow of payments: GDP used for factor payments, which becomes national income, which is used for consumption to buy GDP.

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ARC ELASTICITY

The average elasticity for discrete changes in two variables. The distinguishing characteristic of arc elasticity is that percentage changes are calculated based on the average of initial and ending values of each variable, rather than initial values. Arc elasticity is generally calculated using the midpoint elasticity formula. The contrast to arc elasticity is point elasticity. For infinitesimally small changes in two variables, arc elasticity is the same as point elasticity.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through mail order catalogs hoping to buy either a how-to book on building remote controlled airplanes or an extra large beach blanket. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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Much of the $15 million used by the United States to finance the Louisiana Purchase from France was borrowed from European banks.
"Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success. "

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JHR
Journal of Human Resources
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