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GDP PRICE DEFLATOR: A price index calculated as the ratio nominal gross domestic product to real gross domestic product. Also commonly referred to as the implicit price deflator, the GDP price deflator is used as an indicator of the economy's average price level. This price index is tabulated and reported every three months along with the gross domestic product, national income, and related measures that make up the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). If you haven't guessed already, the GDP part of GDP price deflator stands for gross domestic product.

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Lesson 11: Circular Flow | Unit 2: Financial Markets Page: 9 of 22

Topic: Investment <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

Investment is business expenditures on gross domestic product for capital goods.
  • The green flow from the business sector to the product markets is investment. The physical flow of capital goods moves in the opposite direction.
The process:
  • Financial markets have buyers (savers) and sellers (borrowers).
  • Savers buy legal claims that divert income TO financial markets.
  • Borrowers sell legal claims that divert income OUT of the financial markets.
  • The business sector borrows income through financial markets, which is used to finance capital investment.

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VAULT CASH

Paper bills and metal coins kept in bank vaults or elsewhere in banks (such as teller drawers). Vault cash is used, quite literally, to "cash" checks and otherwise to satisfy currency withdrawal demands of the depositors. Because vault cash is in the possession of banks and not the nonbank public, it is not considered as "money in circulation" and is not part of the official M1 money supply. Vault cash is one of two types of bank assets that are considered reserves and used to satisfy reserve requirements. The other is Federal Reserve deposits.

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APLS

BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store wanting to buy either a genuine fake plastic Tiffany lamp or a microwave over that won't burn your popcorn. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

It's estimated that the U.S. economy has about $20 million of counterfeit currency in circulation, less than 0.001 perecent of the total legal currency.
"No man, for any considerable time, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude without finally getting bewildered as to which may be true."

-- Nathanial Hawthorne, Author

NIPA
National Income and Product Accounts
A PEDestrian's Guide
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