March 23, 2018 

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KEMP-ROTH ACT: Officially titled the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981, this was a cornerstone of economic policy under President Reagan. The three components of this act were: (1) a decrease in individual income taxes, phased in over three years, (2) a decrease in business taxes, primarily through changes in capital depreciation, and (3) the indexing of taxes to inflation, which was implemented in 1985. This act was intended to address the stagflation problems of high unemployment and high inflation that existed during that 1970s and to provide greater incentives for investment. A primary theoretical justification is found in the Laffer curve relation between tax rates and total tax collections.

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Lesson 9: Macro Basics | Unit 3: Business Cycles Page: 9 of 16

Topic: Causes <=PAGE BACK | PAGE NEXT=>

To understand business cycles, we need the causes:
  1. Consumption: If households decide to buy more or less, the rest of the economy follows suit.
  2. Capital Investment: Big swings can set in motion upward or downward spirals of total production.
  3. Government Purchases and Taxes: Government purchases can be contractionary or expansionary effect over the economy. Taxes affect the ability of the household and business sectors to buy production.
  4. Net Exports: Changes in exports can trigger expansions and contractions of the domestic economy.
  5. Circulating Money: Too much money can trigger and inflationary expansion, too little money can trigger contraction and unemployment.
  6. Resource Supply Considerations: Resource supply changes (energy prices, technology, wages, etc.) can trigger expansions and contractions.

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A tangible item produced with society's limited resources for the purpose of satisfying wants and needs. As a general notion, the phrase economic good also commonly includes intangible services produced with society's limited resources for the purpose of satisfying wants and needs. A synonymous term for economic good is scarce good.

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[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages seeking to buy either a wall poster commemorating yesterday or pink cotton balls. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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A scripophilist is one who collects rare stock and bond certificates, usually from extinct companies.
"It is not the straining for great things that is most effective; it is the doing of the little things, the common duties, a little better and better."

-- Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Writer

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