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GROWTH RATE: The percentage change in a variable from one year to the next. The growth rate, in effect, measures how much the variable is growing over time. In that economists (as well as regular human people) are quite interested in economic growth, progress, and a lessening of the scarcity problem, growth rates for different economic variables are closely scrutinized. Among the most important are: real gross domestic product, population, and per capita income. Growth rates are important not only for the analysis of long-run progress (economic growth, economic development), but also short-run instability (business cycles)

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INVESTMENT BORROWING:

The acquisition of funds through the financial markets by the business sector which are used to finance investment expenditures on capital goods. In terms of the simple circular flow model, this is one of two basic demands for household saving diverted into financial markets. The other is government borrowing.
Investment borrowing is a prime source of funds used by the business sector to pay for investment expenditures on capital goods. Other sources of financing come from internal savings of revenue that the business sector receives from the sale of production, especially retained earnings and capital consumption adjustment.

Working the Financial Markets

The business sector obtains funds used for investment through the financial markets. The function of financial markets is to divert household sector income to other expenditures, especially investment expenditures and government purchases. They accomplish this by trading legal claims.
  • Savers and Buyers: On one side of the financial markets, savers in the household sector buy legal claims and in so doing divert income to the financial markets. They give up income in exchange for the legal claims to the ownership of physical assets or to future repayment of income.

  • Borrowers and Sellers: On the other side, borrowers in the business and government sectors sell legal claims and in so doing obtain the income from the financial markets that they use to undertake expenditures. The borrowers give up legal claims in exchange for income.

Accumulating Income

The business sector borrows income through the financial markets to accumulate income used to finance expensive capital investment. Investment borrowing allows the business sector access to larger amounts of funds than that obtained from current revenue alone.

Suppose, for example, that OmniConglomerate, Inc. wants to finance the construction of a new $100 million factory. It can make this expenditure outright if it has $100 million of extra funds laying around. However, if such funds are not available, it can sell legal claims through the financial markets by issuing corporate bonds, selling extra corporate stock, or signing a loan agreement with a bank.

While this $100 million could come from a single member of the household sector, in all likelihood it is obtained from thousands or even millions of individual savers. Suppose that OmniConglomerate obtains the $100 million through a bank loan from OmniBank. OmniBank has $100 million to lend only because it accumulates small amounts (say $100) from a large number of customers (say 1 million). Each OmniBank customer diverts a little income away from consumption and into the financial markets, which OmniBank combines into the $100 million loan to OmniConglomerate.

The Circular Flow

The Circular Flow
Circular Flow
Investment borrowing by the business sector can be illustrated with the circular flow model. The circular flow captures the continuous movement of production, consumption, income, and factor payments between producers and consumers.

A basic representation of the circular flow is displayed to the right. The components of this model are the four macroeconomic sectors--household, business, government and foreign--and the three macroeconomic markets--product, resource, and financial.

The household sector at the far left contains the consuming population of the economy. The business sector at the far right includes all of the producers. The government sector is positioned in the middle of the diagram and the foreign sector is at the very top.

The product markets near the top of the flow direct production from the business sector to the household sector in exchange for payment flowing in the opposite direction. The resource markets at the bottom of the flow direct factor services from the household sector to the business sector in exchange for payment flowing in the opposite direction. The financial markets located just above the resource markets divert saving from the household sector to business and government borrowing.

The circular flow indicates that the income used by the household sector to purchase goods through the product markets is obtained by selling factor services through the resource markets. It also indicates that the revenue used by the business sector to pay for factor services obtained through the resource markets is generated by selling goods through the product markets.

Investment borrowing is the flow between the financial markets and the business sector. The business sector obtains income used for investment expenditures from the saving diverted into the financial markets from the household sector.

<= INVESTMENTINVESTMENT BUSINESS CYCLES =>


Recommended Citation:

INVESTMENT BORROWING, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: November 24, 2020].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | government borrowing | investment expenditures | investment | consumption expenditures | consumption | saving | government purchases | government expenditures | net exports |


Or For A Little Background...

     | business sector | financial markets | macroeconomics | capital |


And For Further Study...

     | circular flow | business cycles | economic goals | macroeconomic sectors | macroeconomic markets | macroeconomic problems | macroeconomic theories | investment, production possibilities | investment business cycles |


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