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LOANS: In general, transactions in which legal claims are exchanged for money. The legal claim is typically a contract or promissory note stipulating when and how the money will be repaid. The lender gives up the money and receives the legal claim. The borrower gives up the legal claim and receives the money. A loan can be either an asset or a liability, depending on who does the borrowing and who does the lending. To the borrower, a loan is a liability, something that is owed. The borrower must pay off the loan or repurchase the legal claim. However, to the lender, a loan is an asset, something that is owned. In fact, loans represent a significant part of a bank's assets.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Factor Markets
  • Getting Paid
  • Trading Resources
  • Resources
  • Factor Payments
  • Circular Flow
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Derived Demand
  • Factor Demand
  • A Few Issues
  • Marginal Productivity Theory
  • Three (Or Four) Marginals
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: The Curve
  • Marginal Revenue Product Schedule
  • Marginal Revenue Product Curve
  • The Hiring Decision
  • Factor Demand Curve
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Shifting Demand
  • Product Demand
  • Factor Productivity
  • Other Prices
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Taking Stock
  • Review
  • Preview
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Factor Demand

    • The first unit of this lesson, Background, begins this lesson by laying the foundations for the study of factor demand.
    • In the second unit, Derived Demand, we see how the demand for a factor of production is based on the demand for the good it produces.
    • The third unit, The Curve, then derives the factor demand curve, which is the relation between the price employers are willing to pay and the quantity demanded.
    • In the fourth unit, Determinants, we examine the three key determinants that shift the factor demand curve -- product price, factor productivity, and other factor prices.
    • The fifth and final unit, Taking Stock, then closes this lesson with a review of factor demand and a preview of factor market analysis in other lessons.

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