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CASH: the common term for paper currency and metal coins components of the money supply. Cash includes the foldable green paper with portraits of famous dead people, and those shiny metal discs with raised imprints of famous dead people. Cash is often divided into the "cash in circulation" which is what the nonbank public uses for purchases, and "vault cash" which is what banks have stashed away in the large, highly-secured, vaults. Cash in circulation is part of the money supply. Vault cash is part of bank reserves.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • Stretchability
  • Responsiveness
  • Quantity Changes
  • Some Definitions
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: A Little More
  • Two Categories
  • Why Study: Market Shocks
  • Why Study: Taxes
  • Why Study: Price Controls
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Measurement
  • Two Types
  • The Coefficient
  • Doing The Numbers: Endpoint
  • Doing The Numbers: Midpoint
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: A Continuum
  • Elasticity Alternatives
  • Perfectly Elastic
  • Relative Elastic
  • Perfectly Inelastic
  • Relatively Inelastic
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Market Elasticity
  • Four Measures
  • Elasticity Determinants
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Elasticity Basics

    In this lesson, we will examine the basics of elasticity, including what it is, how it is measured, and how it is used in market analysis.

    • The first unit of this lesson, The Concept, introduces the elasticity concept and previews its role in market analysis.
    • In the second unit, A Little More, examines the importance of elasticity for such topics as market shocks, taxes, and price controls.
    • The third unit, Measurement, takes a close look at how elasticity is measured, focusing on the coefficient of elasticity.
    • The fourth unit, A Continuum, examines the five categories of elasticity, ranging from elastic to inelastic, that form a continuum.
    • The fifth unit and final unit, Market Elasticity, closes this lesson by introducing four key elasticity concepts for the market demand and supply.

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    ABSTRACTION

    Simplifying the complexities of the real world by ignoring (hopefully) unimportant details while doing economic analysis. Abstraction is an essential feature of the scientific method. Hypothesis verification, model construction, and comparative static analysis are not possible without abstraction.

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    APLS

    ORANGE REBELOON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club hoping to buy either a replacement nozzle for your shower or a decorative windchime with plastic . Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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    This isn't me! What am I?

    The 1909 Lincoln penny was the first U.S. coin with the likeness of a U.S. President.
    "Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement."

    -- Henry Ford

    NZFOE
    New Zealand Futures and Options Exchange
    A PEDestrian's Guide
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