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PARADOX OF THRIFT: The notion that an increase in saving, which is prudent for an individual during bad economic times, is not the best course of action for the macroeconomy. If total saving in the economy increases, then consumption and aggregate expenditures decline, which causes a decline in aggregate output.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: The Concept
  • Stretchability
  • Responsiveness
  • Quantity Changes
  • Some Definitions
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: A Little More
  • Two Categories
  • Why Study: Market Shocks
  • Why Study: Taxes
  • Why Study: Price Controls
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Measurement
  • Two Types
  • The Coefficient
  • Doing The Numbers: Endpoint
  • Doing The Numbers: Midpoint
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: A Continuum
  • Elasticity Alternatives
  • Perfectly Elastic
  • Relative Elastic
  • Perfectly Inelastic
  • Relatively Inelastic
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Market Elasticity
  • Four Measures
  • Elasticity Determinants
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Elasticity Basics

    In this lesson, we will examine the basics of elasticity, including what it is, how it is measured, and how it is used in market analysis.

    • The first unit of this lesson, The Concept, introduces the elasticity concept and previews its role in market analysis.
    • In the second unit, A Little More, examines the importance of elasticity for such topics as market shocks, taxes, and price controls.
    • The third unit, Measurement, takes a close look at how elasticity is measured, focusing on the coefficient of elasticity.
    • The fourth unit, A Continuum, examines the five categories of elasticity, ranging from elastic to inelastic, that form a continuum.
    • The fifth unit and final unit, Market Elasticity, closes this lesson by introducing four key elasticity concepts for the market demand and supply.

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    AVERAGE VARIABLE COST CURVE

    A curve that graphically represents the relation between average variable cost incurred by a firm in the short-run product of a good or service and the quantity produced. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between average variable cost and the level of output, holding other variables, like technology and resource prices, constant. The average variable cost curve is one of three average curves. The other two are average total cost curve and average fixed cost curve. A related curve is the marginal cost curve.

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    APLS

    PURPLE SMARPHIN
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads hoping to buy either income tax software or a how-to book on the art of negotiation. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    Parker Brothers, the folks who produce the Monopoly board game, prints more Monopoly money each year than real currency printed by the U.S. government.
    "All things are difficult before they are easy."

    -- Thomas Fuller, Physician

    WACM
    Weak Axiom of Cost Minimization
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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