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December 10, 2022 

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REALISM OF PERFECT COMPETITION: Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that does NOT exist in the real world. While some real world industries might come relatively close to a one or two of the four key characteristics of perfect competition, none matches all four sufficiently that we can declare a perfectly competitively industry. Some industries come close on the large number of small firms and the identical product characteristics. A few industries have relatively good, although not perfect, information about prices and technology. However, almost all industries fall far short of the perfect mobility characteristics.

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BALANCE OF TRADE SURPLUS: An imbalance in a nation's balance of trade in which the payments for merchandise exports received by the country exceed payments for merchandise imports paid by the country. This is also termed a favorable balance of trade. It's considered favorable because more goods are exported out of the country than are imported in, meaning that foreign production is replaced with domestic production, which then increases domestic employment and income. A balance of trade surplus is often the source of a balance of payments surplus.

     See also | balance of trade | export | import | circular flow | balance of trade deficit | balance of payments surplus | international trade | foreign trade | domestic | foreign | current account |


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OLIGOPOLY, BEHAVIOR

Oligopolistic industries share several behavioral tendencies, including: (1) interdependence, (2) rigid prices, (3) nonprice competition, (4) mergers, and (5) collusion. In other words, each oligopolistic firm keeps a close eye on the decisions made by other firms in the industry (interdependence), are reluctant to change prices (rigid prices), but instead try to attract customers from the competition using incentives other than prices (nonprice competition), and when they get tired of competing with their competitors they are inclined to cooperate formally and legally (mergers) or informally and illegally (collusion).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a coffee table shaped like the state of Florida or storage boxes for your summer clothes. Be on the lookout for high interest rates.
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