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AE LINE: Another term for aggregate expenditure line, which is a line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

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BALANCED-BUDGET MULTIPLIER: The ratio of the change in aggregate output (GDP) to a change in government spending, which are matched by an equal change in taxes. This is termed a balanced-budget multiplier because the change in spending is matched by the change in taxes and thus the government's budget deficit or surplus is neither increased nor decreased. If the government had a balanced budget before the changes, then it has one after the changes.

     See also | aggregate output | gross domestic product | government | taxes | multiplier | budget deficit | budget surplus | government purchases | transfer payments | household sector | government sector | consumption | disposable income |


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BALANCED-BUDGET MULTIPLIER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: June 17, 2021].


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INTEREST-RATE EFFECT

A change in aggregate expenditures on real production, especially those made by the household and business sectors, that results because a change in the price level alters the interest rate which then affects the cost of borrowing. This is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are real-balance effect and net-export effect.

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