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SAVINGS DEPOSITS: Accounts maintained by banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and mutual savings banks that pay interest but can not be used directly as money. These accounts, also termed transactions deposits, let customers set aside a portion of their liquid assets that COULD be used to make purchases. But to make those purchases, savings account balances must be transferred to checkable deposits or currency. However, this transference is easy enough that savings accounts are often termed near money. Savings accounts, as such constitute a sizeable portion of the M2 monetary aggregate.

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BANK: A financial organization that accepts deposits, makes loans, and directly controls a significant portion of the nation's money supply. In the olden days of the economy (before 1980), a bank was easy to identify because it had the word "bank" in it's name -- such as "First National Bank", "Second National Bank", etc. However, after several laws were passed in the early 1980s to reform and deregulate the banking industry, the term bank has come to functionally include other financial institutions that previously went by the titles of "Savings and Loan," "Credit Union," and "Mutual Savings Banks." These institutions are operationally considered banks because they all perform "banking" functions -- especially accepting checking account deposits and making loans.

     See also | deposits | loans | money supply | Federal Reserve System | financial intermediary | saving | business sector | investment | fractional-reserve banking | bank panic | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | savings and loan association | credit union | mutual savings bank |


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INJECTIONS LINE

A graphical representation of the relation between the level of aggregate production and one or more injections. The three injections (non-consumption expenditures on aggregate production) are investment expenditures, government purchases and exports. The injections line sequentially adds, or layers, each of these three expenditures depending on the number of sectors used in the analysis (two, three, or four). The slope of the injections line depends on which if any of the expenditures are induced by aggregate production. The injections line is combined with the leakages line (containing saving, taxes, and imports) in the Keynesian injections-leakages model.

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