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RESOURCE PRICE, AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANT: One of three categories of aggregate supply determinants assumed constant when the aggregate supply curve is constructed, and which shifts the aggregate supply curve when it changes. An increase in a resource price causes a decrease (leftward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. A decrease in a resource price causes an increase (rightward shift) of the short-run aggregate supply curve. The other two categories of aggregate supply determinants are resource quantity and resource quality. Specific determinants falling into this general category include wages and energy prices. Anything affecting the prices paid for the use of labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship is also included.

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FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM: THE central bank of the United States. It includes a Board of Governors, 12 District Banks, 25 Branch Banks, and assorted committees. The most important of these committees is the Federal Open Market Committee, which directs monetary policy. The Fed (as many like to call it) was established in 1913 and modified significantly during the Great Depression of the 1930s. It's duties are to maintain the stability of the banking system, regulate banks, and oversee the nation's money supply.

     See also | Board of Governors | Board of Governors, Chairman | Federal Reserve Bank | Federal Reserve District Bank | Federal Reserve Branch Bank | Board of Governors | Federal Open Market Committee | Federal Advisory Council | money supply | monetary policy | bank | monetary aggregate | open market operations | discount rate | reserve requirements | Federal Reserve note | bank reserves | Federal Reserve deposits |


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PROPRIETORS' INCOME

The official factor payment item in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economics Analysis measuring the combined payments for all four factors of production used in owner-operated business firms. Specifically, proprietors' income is the excess of revenue over explicit production cost of owner-operated businesses and includes payments for labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship. This is one of five official factor payments making up national income. The other four are compensation of employees, rental income of persons, net interest, and corporate profits. Proprietors' income is usually less than 10 percent of national income, typically in the 7 to 10 percent range.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area looking to buy either a decorative windchime with plastic or a flower arrangement for that special day for your mother. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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