Google
Thursday 
February 2, 2023 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
DECISION LAG: The time lag that it takes government leaders and policy makers to determine the appropriate government action needed to address an economic problem. The decision lag arises because it takes time for policy makers to chose among the array of possible policy actions, each with assorted consequences that appeal differently to different political constituencies. This "inside lag" is one of four policy lags associated with monetary and fiscal policy. The other two "inside lags" are recognition lag and implementation lag, and one "outside lag" is implementation lag. All four policy lags can reduce the effectiveness of business-cycle stabilization policies and can even destabilize the economy.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

CONSUMPTION TAX: A tax on consumer's spending for goods, services and the other stuff they buy. One sort of consumption tax is the sales tax. Some politicians and balding, bespectacled economists argue that the current income tax system should be replaced with a consumption tax. This means any income that's saved wouldn't be taxed. The idea behind a consumption tax is to encourage saving, which is then used for investment, which then promotes economic growth. Such a tax would be easily implemented (you get a deduction for saving on the current income tax form), but it would tend to be a regressive tax hitting the poor harder than the wealthy.

     See also | consumption | tax | sales tax | income tax | saving | investment | economic growth | regressive tax |


Recommended Citation:

CONSUMPTION TAX, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2023. [Accessed: February 2, 2023].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MARGINAL REVENUE, PERFECT COMPETITION

The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a perfectly competitive firm receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a perfectly competitive firm equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

WHITE GULLIBON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites trying to buy either a how-to book on home repairs or a large, stuffed kitty cat. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The first paper notes printed in the United States were in denominations of 1 cent, 5 cents, 25 cents, and 50 cents.
"We tend to forget that happiness doesn't come as a result of getting something we don't have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have."

-- Fredrick Koeing

GARCH
Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2023 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster