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LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE: The proportion of the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over that is in the civilian labor force. The labor force participation rate is essentially the ratio of the civilian labor force to the total noninstitutionalized civilian population 16 years of age and over. This ratio indicates the proportion of the available "working age" population that is willing and able to work and is either employed or actively seeking employment.

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DEMAND-PULL INFLATION: Demand-pull inflation places responsibility for inflation squarely on the shoulders of increases in aggregate demand. This type of inflation results when the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) collectively try to purchase more output that the economy is capable of producing. In general, increasing aggregate demand means buyers want more production than the economy is able to provide. Then end result is that buyers bid up the price of existing production. The extra demand "pulls" the price level higher. You might want to compare demand-pull inflation with cost-push inflation.

     See also | inflation | aggregate demand | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | aggregate expenditures | cost-push inflation | production possibilities frontier | aggregate market | long-run aggregate supply curve | aggregate demand curve | shortage | price level |


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DEMAND-PULL INFLATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: December 3, 2021].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

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