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June 18, 2024 

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GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT AND NATIONAL INCOME: Gross domestic product (GDP) is the total market value of all final goods and services produced within the political boundaries of an economy during a given period of time, usually a year. National income (NI) is the total income earned by the citizens of the national economy resulting from their ownership of resources used in the production of final goods and services during a given period of time, usually one year. While the vast majority of domestic production is undertaken by domestic factors of production (national income is about 80% of gross domestic product) key differences do exist. The six main differences between gross domestic product and national income are (1) capital consumption adjustment, (2) indirect business taxes, (3) business transfer payments, (4) net foreign factor income, (5) government subsidies, and (6) statistical discrepancy.

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ECONOMIES OF SCOPE: A production process in which it is cheaper to produce two (or more) products together rather than separately. This property is also termed joint production. For example the production of beef also results in the production of leather and the production of lumber also results in the production of sawdust. Economies of scope can be beneficial, that is, giving a producer multiple products to sell. But it can also be problematic when one of the joint products is undesirable, such as pollution or waste residual.

     See also | complement-in-production | joint product | externality | pollution | joint production |


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ECONOMIES OF SCOPE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: June 18, 2024].


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AGGREGATE DEMAND CURVE

A graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand (AD) curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the long-run aggregate supply curve and/or the short-run aggregate supply curve. The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate, real-balance, and net-export effects.

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