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February 2, 2023 

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SAVING: The after-tax disposable income of the household sector that is not used for consumption expenditures. In general terms, saving is the use of income to purchase legal claims through financial markets rather than the direct purchase of physical goods and services. In the macroeconomic world modeled by the circular flow, saving is the diversion of household income away from consumption and into the financial markets. In this model, saving is a primary source of funds used for business investment expenditures for capital goods. Saving is also used to finance government expenditures.

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FALLACY OF FALSE CAUSE: The logical fallacy of arguing that two events that are correlated (that is, happen at about the same time), are assumed to have a causal connection. In other words, one event causes the other. This was one of the more common fallacies committed by ancient ancestors. During the last full moon, your dog died. Obviously the full moon killed your dog. While this might seem reasonable to anyone spending their lives eating mastodon meat and sleeping in caves, it's actually the fallacy of false cause.

     See also | fallacy | fallacy of division | fallacy of composition | fallacy of false authority | fallacy of mass appeal | fallacy of personal attack | normative economics | positive economics | cause and effect | scientific method |


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AGGREGATE MARKET SHOCKS

Disruptions of the equilibrium in the aggregate market (or AS-AD model) caused by shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, or long-run aggregate supply curves. Shocks of the aggregate market are associated with, and thus used to analyze, assorted macroeconomic phenomena such as business cycles, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and economic growth. The specific analysis of aggregate market shocks identifies changes in the price level (GDP price deflator) and real production (real GDP). Changes in the price level and real production have direct implications for the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, national income, and a host of other macroeconomic measures.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club hoping to buy either 500 feet of telephone cable or a package of 4 by 6 index cards, the ones with lines. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
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