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QUASI-PUBLIC: A good or activity that is some, but not all characteristics of a public good or activity. The term quasi-public is often used in connection with business activities that are privately controlled, but which are authorized by government legislation. The Federal National Mortgage Association is one example. Quasi-public is also commonly used in reference to goods that have one but not both of the key characteristics of a public good--nonrival consumption or nonexcludability of nonpayers. Information are transportation examples of quasi-public goods in which nonpayers can be excluded from use (like a private good) but are nonrival in consumption (like a public good).

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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY: The total (or aggregate) real production of final goods and services available in the domestic economy at a range of price levels, during a period of time in which all prices, especially wages, are flexible, and have achieved their equilibrium levels. Long-run aggregate supply (LRAS) is one of two aggregate supply alternatives, distinguished by the degree of price flexibility; the other is short-run aggregate supply (SRAS).

     See also | aggregate market | long-run aggregate market | full employment | price level | real production | flexible prices | aggregate demand | short-run aggregate supply | economic growth | business cycles | unemployment | inflation |


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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: October 6, 2022].


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GOOD TYPES

The economy produces four distinct types of goods based on two key characteristics -- consumption rivalry and nonpayer excludability. Consumption rivalry arises if consumption of a good by one person prevents another from also consuming. Nonpayer excludability means potential consumers who do not pay for a good can be excluded from consuming. Private goods are rival in consumption and easily subject to the exclusion of nonpayers. Public goods are nonrival in consumption and the exclusion of nonpayers is virtually impossible. Near-public goods are nonrival in consumption and easily subject to exclusion. Common-property goods are rival in consumption and not easily subject to exclusion. Private goods can be efficiently exchanged through markets. Public, near-public and common-property goods cannot, but require some degree of government involvement for efficiency.

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