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May 13, 2021 

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RISK LOVING: A person who values a certain income less than an equal amount of income that involves risk or uncertainty. Suppose that you have two options--(A) a guaranteed $1,000 or (b) a 50-50 chance of getting either $500 or $1,500. If you chose option B, then you're risk loving. While both options give you the same "expected" values, you get more satisfaction from the risky option than the guaranteed one. In fact, risk loving people are willing to pay for the opportunity to experience a risky situation.

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LONG-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET: A macroeconomic model relating the price level and real production under the assumption that ALL prices flexible. This is one of two aggregate market submodels used to analyze business cycles, aggregate production, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and related macroeconomic phenomena. The other is the short-run aggregate market. The long-run aggregate market isolates the interaction between aggregate demand and long-run aggregate supply. The key assumption of this model is that ALL prices, especially resource prices, are flexible. The primary result of this model is that the economy achieves long-run equilibrium at full-employment real production.

     See also | aggregate market | long run, macroeconomics | price level | real production | flexible prices | short-run aggregate market | aggregate demand | long-run aggregate supply | long-run equilibrium | full employment | full-employment real production |


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MARGINAL REVENUE CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the marginal revenue received by a firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. A firm maximizes profit by producing the quantity of output found at the intersection of the marginal revenue curve and marginal cost curve. The marginal revenue curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The marginal revenue curve for a firm with market control is negatively sloped and lies below the average revenue curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites hoping to buy either hand lotion, a big bottle of hand lotion or a lighted magnifying glass. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
"The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss. "

-- Thomas Carlyle, Historian

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