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IMPACT LAG: In the context of economic policies, the time between corrective government action responding to a shock to the economy and the resulting affect on the economy. This is one of four lags in the use of economic policies. The others are recognition lag, decision lag, and action lag. The length of the impact lag, also termed outside lag, is primarily based on the speed of the multiplier process and is essentially the same for both fiscal and monetary policy. The length of the policy lags is one argument against the use of discretionary policies to stability business cycles.

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FULL-EMPLOYMENT REAL PRODUCTION: The quantity of real production or real aggregate output (or better yet, real gross domestic product) produced by the macroeconomy when resources are at full employment. For all practical purposes, full-employment real production is real GDP produced when unemployment is at it's natural level, the combination of frictional and structural unemployment that can be maintained without inflation (or deflation either). For the aggregate market analysis, this is the level of real production achieved and maintained in the long run. The long-run aggregate supply curve is vertical at full-employment real production.

     See also | real production | full employment | real gross domestic product | macroeconomics | unemployment | natural unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | aggregate market | long-run aggregate supply curve |


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OTHER PRICES, DEMAND DETERMINANT

The prices of other goods that influence the decision to purchase a particular good, which are assumed constant when a demand curve is constructed. Other prices can be for goods that are either substitutes-in-consumption or complements-in-consumption. This is one of five demand determinants that shift the demand curve when they change. The other four are other prices, buyers' preferences, buyers' expectations, and number of buyers.

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